Chau Do

Deputy Comptroller for Risk Analysis

Chau Do

Chau Do serves as the Deputy Comptroller for the Risk Analysis Division within Economics at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC).

In this capacity, Dr. Do oversees the four Risk Analysis divisions in the agency’s Economics Department that provide expertise to the agency on quantitative modeling of credit risk, market risk, compliance risk, and enterprise-wide risk. She also serves as a key advisor and technical expert on practical and policy issues related to the use of quantitative models by banks and the oversight of banks’ risk models by supervisors. She assumed these duties on December 23, 2018.

Prior to this role, Dr. Do served as the Director for the Compliance Risk Analysis Division. She joined the OCC in 2004 and previously worked at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as an economist.

Dr. Do holds a Ph.D., in economics from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a bachelor’s degree from Santa Clara University.

  1. Do, Chau and Arturo Gonzalez (2014). "Hispanic Brokers and Borrowers: The Effect of Language Affinity on the Price of Home Mortgages," Regional Science and Urban Economics, November 2014.
  2. Do, Chau (2012). “Home Equity Lines of Credit: Differences Across Race and Ethnicity,” Housing Studies, Vol. 27 (3).
  3. Do, Chau and Irina Paley (2011). “Altruism in the House: The Impact of Home Equity on Charitable Giving.” Review of Economics of the Household, Vol. 10 (3).
  4. Do, Chau and Irina Paley (2007). “Explaining the Growth of Higher-Priced Loans in HMDA: The Oaxaca Decomposition Approach.” Journal of Real Estate Research, Vol. 29 (4).
  5. Do, Chau and Kelly Bedard (2005). “Are Middle Schools Effective? The Impact of School System Configuration on Student Outcomes.” Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 40 (3).
  6. Do, Chau (2004). “The Effect of Local Colleges on the Quality of the College Attended,” Economics of Education Review, Vol. 23 (3).
  7. Do, Chau and Irina Paley. “Gender and Mortgage Choice: More Evidence of Gender Based Risk Aversion.” Feminist Economics, Vol. 19 (2).